iPhoneography R.I.P. (2007-2013)

the not-so-greatly-named iPhoneography was great while it lasted. the problem? stagnation. but what about the Megapixels? inorite?

long live mobile photography!

mobile photography did bring about a new way of carrying about with some aspect of photography: mobility, self-contained and social interactions. in effect, a compact Polaroid system with replication for sharing among people. beyond Polaroid, it offered many ways to present/process a photo to make it "warm" by applying processing that made it be more like film. one fallacy of new technology, for a while, is to think it terms of replacement: dSLR replaces SLR, and digital sensor is a replacement for film... and it takes a while to think of the new technology as something new with different limitations that are inherited in our minds by the imitated medium. 

the issue with iPhoneography is that the platform moved into other brands, so one could argue for Phoneography instead, but even that is not that appealing. yes, one can pursue a photography that is enabled by one tool: a film camera with a single lens (e.g., Leica with a 35mm, or a Hassy with an 80mm, or a Rolleiflex with 75mm), and we have the work of Daido Moriyama with a compact camera. but for most, photography is about flexibility and being able to take the best photo at any given moment.

the appeal is greatly based on the speed of photography offered by something like a phone's camera. snap the photo, and process it within in the camera. for the most part, compact camera makers have forgone this revelation as to what is popular with people. instead, the compact camera remains a photo, upload, process and share. these days, the ability to upload from a compact to a mobile platform, as in a phone or tablet, is becoming much more easier. for some people, for varying reasons, the speed has to be nearly immediate — snap, app to process and upload. 

I personally do not have such speed requirement, though I do like the disposability of mobile photography to approach photography in new ways. such is the case with photography styles and subject matter that I would not otherwise consider when focused on a project with "the better cameras." I also like the processing limitations of a phone/tablet to get me past any push to make the most of the photo via post-processing.

however, iPhoneography stagnated. just like compact cameras failed to move into the closed system of a phone for snap/processing/sharing, the phone cameras have remained stagnant in low-light performance, and more importantly, fixed lens**. (there are kludges to change field of view.) with mobile phones migrating into data devices, and less about talking, then solutions (if physically possible!) that offer some variations on the lenses would increase the versatility of phones in photography.

Sony has offered their QX-10/100 devices to keep the phone connected/interactive with an improved lens/sensor, and this may be the first step into improvement of the usefulness of a phone.

by considering mobile photography, and not thinking just of a phone, one can use the convenience of a phone and the greater flexibility (and performance) of a compact camera. the idea remains that "mobile photography" is about the speed of snap/process/share, and the compact camera retains that ability. 

in that sense, the phone camera is now for me about "social" sharing, rather than considering photography, and I have embraced the compact camera as my mobile way of recording photographs, and using the phone/tablet for the mobile photography constraint.

with that in mind, I have done the un-mobile thing, and uploaded the iPhone photos to Lightroom, made corrections to distortions, and processed all photos using VSCOfilm. in a way, it is a means to give these photos a final respect and to think of the phone's camera as being on par with any other camera, rather than a disposable/ephemeral usage. the slide show contains highlights of these photos.

while iPhoneography now settles into its limitations — which can still serve a purpose, and its nearly-fixed perimeter remains a means to enjoy photography + social interactions — mobile photography is really the next step into widening a photography that is convenient and offering much more overlap with what was previously considered "serious photography."

iPhoneography 2007 - 2013 (selection)

iPhone photos 2007-2013 by Kodiak Xyza

the use of Lightroom was limited to the Basic Module sliders and applying automatic perspective corrections, which are not (readily?) available within mobile platforms. this way, one of the major drawbacks of the iPhone lens made some photos — especially architectural ones — become sensible in terms of quality. noise reduction was also key, due to the poor noise vs. ISO performance of the phone. nothing could save the pixelation of night shots, so those are best left as ephemeral social-sharing photos. VSCOfilm helped to keep the processing to nearly as fast as can be done in a mobile platform.


[ link ] iPhoneography 2007-2013 at Dunked using LightroomVSCOfilm
(sectioned by USA/California/Europe/Japan/Abstract/NewTopgraphics)

link ] iPhoneography 2007-2013 at VSCO Grid using VSCOcam phone app (ongoing)

** there are physical limitations, with current technology and perceived form-factors, that would limit these features from being implemented in phones.